Giant cell tumor

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[edit] Discussion of Giant cell tumor

  • Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a relatively common skeletal tumor, accounting for 4%–9.5% of all primary osseous neoplasms and 18%–23% of benign bone neoplasms.
  • Radiography often strongly suggests the diagnosis and reveals an eccentric, lytic lesion centered in the metaepiphysis and extending to subchondral bone with expansile remodeling but lacking internal mineralization.
  • GCT is typically benign but 5%–10% of lesions may be malignant.
  • At histologic analysis, GCTs contain a prominent and diffuse osteoclastic giant cell component and have been referred to in the past as osteoclastomas.
  • Paget disease is rarely associated with either solitary or multiple GCT
  • The peak prevalence is in the third decade of life.
  • The location of GCT is one of the most important features suggesting the diagnosis because approximately 84%–99% of lesions extend to within 1 cm of subarticular bone.
  • The most common specific location of GCT is about the knee (50%–65% of cases)


[edit] Imaging Findings for Giant cell tumor

[edit] Plain film

  • Eccentric, lytic lesion centered in the metaepiphysis and extending to subchondral bone with expansile remodeling but lacking internal mineralization

[edit] Images

Patient #1

Patient #2

[edit] See Also

[edit] External Links

[edit] References for Giant cell tumor