Rickets

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[edit] Discussion

  • Rickets results from deficient mineralization of normal osteoid and interruption of the normal orderly development and mineralization of growth plates.
  • Vitamin D–resistant (hypophosphatemic) and nutritional rickets are the most common types.
  • Radiologic changes in rickets occur predominantly at sites of rapid growth, including the proximal humerus, distal radius, and distal femur and both ends of the tibia.
  • Treatment is dietary and medical.

[edit] Imaging Findings

[edit] Plain films

  • Predominant changes are metaphyseal, with widening of the zone of provisional calcification due to the presence of unmineralized osteoid.
  • Cupping, fraying, and splaying of metaphyses occurs with growth and continued weight bearing.
  • Bowing of long bones

[edit] Images

Patient #1: Radiographs of the knee in a patient with rickets

Patient #2: Radiographs of the knee in a patient with rickets

Patient #3: Radiograph of the chest in a patient with rickets

[edit] See Also

[edit] External Links

[edit] References